Regional Transportation Planner Ron Kirby Murdered In Alexandria Home | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Regional Transportation Planner Ron Kirby Murdered In Alexandria Home

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Ron Kirby, a longtime transportation planner with the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments, was found shot dead in his Alexandria home on Monday.

Ron Kirby was shot several times; a relative found his body inside his home early yesterday afternoon. Alexandria police have not made any arrests and are remaining mum on potential suspects.

Kirby was the head of transportation planning at the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments, where he's worked since 1987. He last appeared on the The Kojo Nnamdi Show in July.

Today the group's executive director Chuck Bean remembered the Australia native as a fixture on the transportation scene.

"Ron was truly a region shaper. He was forward looking," Bean said. "When board members asked me about him, I said, 'Well, I think he is a genius.'"

Kirby was credited with incorporating multi-modal solutions into regional planning — roads, transit, walking, and bicycling, as well as improvements in regional air quality.

He leaves behind a wife and two children. Ron Kirby was 69.

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