MedStar Washington Hospital Center Could Cut Up To 120 Jobs | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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MedStar Washington Hospital Center Could Cut Up To 120 Jobs

Up to 120 jobs could be cut at the Washington Hospital Center.
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Up to 120 jobs could be cut at the Washington Hospital Center.

The District's largest private hospital is cutting jobs due to increasing financial pressure.

Exactly how many people are losing their jobs at MedStar Washington Hospital Center is unclear, but in an internal email President John Sullivan says the hospital is "about 120 positions over budget" this year according to the Washington Business Journal.

Managers getting laid off were told late last week and other employees being impacted will find out today according to hospital officials. They say no bedside nurses will be laid off.

The hospital was $8.5 million short of its budget at the end of September, the third month of the fiscal year, according to the email from Sullivan. He also wrote admissions and inpatient surgeries were down in September.

The president says the financial strain comes from various factors including cuts in reimbursement for Medicare and Medicaid as well as sequestration.

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