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O'Malley Throws Support Behind Raising Minimum Wage In Maryland

Maryland workers could see an increase in the minimum wage to $10 an hour next year.
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Maryland workers could see an increase in the minimum wage to $10 an hour next year.

Maryland governor Martin O'Malley is throwing his support behind raising the minimum wage in the state during next year's General Assembly session.

In an e-mail to supporters, O'Malley says "it's time to raise the minimum wage in Maryland" and directs them to a petition on the website of his political action committee O'Say Can You See to show their support.

Now that O'Malley is on board with effort it means the current governor of Maryland, plus the three Democrats seeking to succeed him in the heavily blue state, now support raising the minimum wage during the next General Assembly session which starts in January in Annapolis.

Last year, a bill which would have raised the rate to $10 dollars per hour failed to get out of committee. But, momentum for raising the minimum wage has steadily increased since then, to the point that Montgomery and Prince George's counties, the two largest jurisdictions in the state, are mulling over bills to raise the rate in their own areas.

NPR

In Beyoncé's 'Formation,' A Glorification Of 'Bama' Blackness

Beyoncé's latest song is for the black Southern woman, says National Book Award winner Jesmyn Ward, who's from Mississippi. It's a message she needed to hear.
WAMU 88.5

Does "Made in DC" Matter?

D.C.'s first bean-to-bar chocolate maker, Undone Chocolate, got its start in local food incubator space Union Kitchen, part of a wave of interest in locally made products which includes a push for a "Made in DC" logo.

WAMU 88.5

Does "Made in DC" Matter?

D.C.'s first bean-to-bar chocolate maker, Undone Chocolate, got its start in local food incubator space Union Kitchen, part of a wave of interest in locally made products which includes a push for a "Made in DC" logo.

NPR

Video Chat Your Way Into College: How Tech Is Changing The Admissions Process

Virtual reality and other innovations are helping international students and colleges tell if they're a good fit.

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