With Virginia Out Of The Way, Attention Shifts To The Real Election: Panda's Name | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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With Virginia Out Of The Way, Attention Shifts To The Real Election: Panda's Name

The female panda cub needs a name, and it's up to you to help decide what it will be.
National Zoo
The female panda cub needs a name, and it's up to you to help decide what it will be.

Now that we've got those pesky human elections done with, it's time to make a much more important decision: what to name the National Zoo's newest panda cub.

The zoo announced on Tuesday that it has opened up voting on five possible names for the female panda cub born to Mei Xiang in August.

The possible names are Bao Bao (precious, treasure), Ling Hua (darling, delicate flower), Long Yun (Chinese symbol of the dragon, charming), Mulan (the legendary Chinese warrior), and Zhen Bao (treasure, valuable).

The last cub born to Mei Xiang in 2005 was named Tai Shan, but was also commonly known as Butterstick after the size of panda cubs at birth.

The winning name will be announced on Dec. 1, and per Chinese tradition, the panda will be officially named when it is 100 days old.

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