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Virginia Voters Choose Women’s Rights In Election

Voters at Tuckahoe Elementary School in Arlington Tuesday cited women's reproductive rights as a driving force in their support of Democrat Terry McAuliffe for governor. 

Lyle Piper, a deputy precinct captain and a Democrat, was accompanied by his daughter, Bailey, at the polls.

Bailey passed out flyers of Democratic sample ballots to people as they entered the school. 

"This election was important to me because of my little girl, Piper said. "Women's rights and control of their healthcare was one of the top things on my list, as was a focus on public education." 

John Seymour, 65, said he supports the Democratic Party because of McAuliffe's stances on women's rights, gun control, medication expansion and education. He and his brother worked on behalf of McAuliffe's campaign and wore "I voted in Arlington" stickers.

"I've been voting since 1968. My first election was Humphrey and Nixon," Seymour said. "It's been a series of losing elections for me. It's nice to have a couple under my belt. These past few presidential cycles have been hopeful for me and the country." 

Sam Brooke also cited women's reproductive rights and women's equality as key issues. 

"I tend to try to vote in general. If your neighbors are talking about it, you're more likely to come vote. The area is pretty politically responsible," Brooke said.

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