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In Alabama, Big Business Beats The Tea Party In A GOP House Race

The battle between the business and Tea Party wings of the Republican Party for Alabama's 1st Congressional District was won by Bradley Byrne, the choice of Chamber of Commerce types.

Byrne defeated Dean Young in the primary election Tuesday, getting 53 percent of the vote versus 47 percent for Young. Winning the GOP primary in the reliably Republican district is seen as tantamount to winning the special election.

Young was the choice of Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore, who became nationally known when he placed a monument to the Ten Commandments at the Alabama Judicial Building.

Byrne, meanwhile, had the support of two former congressman who once represented the district.

The race was closely watched across the nation, some seeing it as a barometer of whether the Tea Party's strength was ebbing.

Also, with the war for the soul of the Republican Party underway between the establishment and Tea Party, the Alabama result could embolden the business types, who hope to edge the party away from some of the more extreme positions on economic and cultural issues that have turned off many voters.

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