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Zukerberg Plans To Run For D.C. Attorney General — If Election Happens

Former D.C. Council candidate Paul Zukerberg is filing papers to run for D.C. attorney general.

The defense attorney has made his name pushing a pro-marijuana platform, but now Zukerberg has a new cause — the need for an independent attorney general. Zukerberg has been the most outspoken critic of the D.C. Council's move to delay next year's attorney general election, and filed a lawsuit challenging the decision.

In 2010, D.C. voters overwhelmingly approved a referendum creating an elected attorney general position. That election was scheduled for 2014, but the Council voted in October to overrule the referendum and push the election back, arguing that no candidate had stepped forward and that there was too much uncertainty surrounding the position.

Speaking on The Politics Hour last month, Zukerberg said that the Council's move was a "power grab" aimed at denying D.C. residents a chance to elected a reform-minded attorney general. "All tyrants say that they're postponing election because the people aren't ready," he said.

A hearing on Zukerbergs's lawsuit, which seeks a preliminary injunction to stop the city from removing the attorney general position on next year's ballot, is scheduled for this week.

Zukerberg, in a statement, says his fight against the city isn't about a any single candidate, but rather about the fundamental right of the people to chose their own form of government.

NPR

Tabasco And Beer-Flavored: Not Your Easter Bunny's Jelly Beans

On the eve of Easter and National Jelly Bean Day, let us probe the mysterious origins and unexpected ascendency of the humble candy. And to celebrate, we've sampled Jelly Belly's newest flavors.
NPR

Tabasco And Beer-Flavored: Not Your Easter Bunny's Jelly Beans

On the eve of Easter and National Jelly Bean Day, let us probe the mysterious origins and unexpected ascendency of the humble candy. And to celebrate, we've sampled Jelly Belly's newest flavors.
NPR

Obama's Favorite County — At Least When It Comes To Giving Speeches

The president has visited Prince George's County, Md., four times this year. It is the most affluent county with an African-American majority. It also happens to be very close to the White House.
NPR

Ohio's Law Against Political Lying Heads To Supreme Court

Can a state law prevent political campaigns from doling out misinformation? Guest host Celeste Headlee learns more from The Plain Dealer's Sabrina Eaton.

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