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Obama Stumps For McAuliffe In Virginia...

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President Barack Obama, right, speaks at a campaign event for Virginia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe, left, at Washington-Lee High School in Arlington, Va. on Sunday, Nov. 3, 2013.
(AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
President Barack Obama, right, speaks at a campaign event for Virginia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe, left, at Washington-Lee High School in Arlington, Va. on Sunday, Nov. 3, 2013.

In Virginia, President Barack Obama spent part of the weekend stumping for Democratic gubernatorial candidate Terry McAullife.

Tomorrow is Election Day, and Democrats are pulling out all the stops to get their base to the polls — including bringing President Obama to a rally at Washington-Lee High School in Arlington that featured thousands of cheering supporters in the final few hours of the campaign.

"Are you going to be willing to out work and out hustle the other folks? Because I guarantee you, Terry McAuliffe is going to be out working and out hustling," he said at the rally.

McAuliffe described his Republican opponent, Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli, as an extremist aligned with a Tea Party who backed the government shutdown.

"We're not going to forget the parents who had to tell their kids that they couldn't work because of Washington dysfunction. And we're not going to forget the contractors, the small business owners and the families who are still trying to recover to this day," he said.

The rally featured a host of speakers, all of whom hammered home the central points of the campaign — supporting access to reproductive rights for women and challenging Cuccinelli's legal pursuit of scientists at the University of Virginia studying climate change.

"If there is one thing we've learned in Richmond, it is that a group of legislators, most of whom are men, shouldn't be telling women what they should and shouldn't be doing with their bodies," said lieutenant governor candidate Ralph Northam.

Congressman Jim Moran attacked the Republican ticket as extreme. "The guy that wants to be governor of Virginia says we need more Ted Cruzes in the U.S. Senate. Can you believe it? We need more Ted Cruzes like we need a hole in the head," he said.

Voter Marimia Balde said she was energized by the rally. "It brought back that energy that we had when we were reelecting President Obama, and as a woman I just felt that I needed to be here because I've seen how health care has helped me," she said.

Turnout projections for the state are expected at two million votes, about half of the voters who participated in last year's presidential election.

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