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To Keep Your Attention, Airline Safety Videos Up Their Game

There is little to enjoy about plane travel in America anymore, but if you have flown Delta Airlines anytime in the last year, you've probably already encountered its delightfully subversive airline safety video. It's your standard "seat-doubles-as-a-flotation-device" information, but with all sorts of fun visual gags mixed in. When I first saw it, it not only put a grin on my face, but it also kept my attention all the way through, as I waited for the next cheeky joke. Check it out.

Now, Virgin America is taking the safety video challenge. "We thought, what better way to shake things up than to re-imagine the safety video through the language of music and dance?" Virgin America writes on its site. Here it is:

Adweek has these details on the makers of the video:

"There's a 'robot rap,' a gyrating nun and countless back-breaking dance moves, all filmed by Step Up 2: The Streets director Jon M. Chu (who also did this recent Microsoft Surface ad) and choreographed by frequent Chu collaborators Jamal Sims and Christopher Scott."

For its part, Delta has updated its in-flight safety message for the holidays. Enjoy.

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NPR

A Compelling Plot Gives Way To Farce In Franzen's Purity

The new novel reveals sharp observations and a great, sprawling story. But critic Roxane Gay says the book gets bogged down with absurdly-drawn characters and misfired critiques of modern life.
NPR

Huge Fish Farm Planned Near San Diego Aims To Fix Seafood Imbalance

The aquaculture project would be the same size as New York's Central Park and produce 11 million pounds of yellowtail and sea bass each year. But some people see it as an aquatic "factory farm."
NPR

CNN Just Found A Way To Get Carly Fiorina Onto The Debate Stage

The former Hewlett-Packard CEO had been fighting CNN's criteria for the September presidential candidates debate. Now, she might get her way and make it into the network's main event.
NPR

How Startups Are Using Tech To Mitigate Workplace Bias

The idea that everyone makes automatic, subconscious associations about people is not new. But now some companies are trying to reduce the impact of such biases in the workplace.

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