Obama Vows HealthCare.gov Problems Will Be Fixed 'ASAP' | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Filed Under:

Obama Vows HealthCare.gov Problems Will Be Fixed 'ASAP'

President Obama on Wednesday said he takes full responsibility for the troubled HealthCare.gov website and is determined to make sure it gets fixed "ASAP."

"The website hasn't worked the way it's supposed to in these past few weeks," he told an audience in Boston. "There's no denying it. The website is too slow ... and I'm not happy about it."

His remarks followed testimony on Wednesday morning in which Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius took blame for the botched website and told Americans during testimony at a congressional hearing: "You deserve better. ... I apologize. ... I'm accountable to you."

The president compared the problems to the rollout of the health care overhaul in Massachusetts that occurred under then-Gov. Mitt Romney in 2006.

"Health care reform in this state was a success," he said. "But there were problems at the start. There were changes that needed to be made."

Even so, the president said, the "parade of horribles" predicted for what's been dubbed "Romneycare" never materialized.

Today, he said, the "vast majority" of Massachusetts citizens are happy with their coverage.

He pointed to popular aspects of the 3-year-old federal law, including an end to discrimination against children with pre-existing conditions and the ability of parents to keep children on their plans until age 26.

As The Associated Press reports:

"Underscoring the president's challenge, the healthcare.gov website was down, because of technical difficulties, during his remarks."

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

What Are The Secrets of Centenarians?

To find the path to long life and health, Dan Buettner studies the world's "Blue Zones," communities whose elders live longer than anyone else on the planet.
NPR

Census Reveals Universe Of Marine Microbes At Bottom Of The Food Chain

The ocean's tiniest inhabitants — including bacteria, plankton, krill — are food for most everything that swims or floats. Now, scientists have completed a count of this vast and diverse hidden world.
NPR

Irish Voters Decide Whether To Legalize Same-Sex Marriage

Polls show the "yes" vote is stronger in the conservative, predominately Catholic country. But public opinion surveys could be masking a "shy no vote," observers say.
NPR

Mechanical Turk Workers: Secret Cogs In The Internet Marketplace

There are hundreds of thousands of people doing stuff to your Internet experience that you may think is the work of an algorithm. They're working from home doing tiny tasks computers can't quite do.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.