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D.C. To Begin Controversial Process Of Redrawing School Boundaries

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The District is looking to revise school boundaries and feeder patterns, a process that's likely to stir controversy.

Abigail Smith, the Deputy Mayor for Education has begun a roughly year-long process that will determine which students can attend which traditional public schools.

This will likely be a contentious issue because if boundaries change, many people worry their children will not be able to attend certain schools. Many residents have bought houses specifically so they have access to particular high performing schools.

This will be the first time the District has changed school boundaries and feeder patterns in more than three decades. Since that time many public schools have closed, public charter schools have opened and the city’s population has grown and shifted considerably.

Smith promises a transparent process with multiple opportunities for residents to have their say. A final plan will be released in September 2014, with changes taking effect during the 2015 academic year. Smith says there will be “grandfathering” provisions included to “buffer the immediate impact” on current students and their families.


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