DDOT To Close Kalmia Road Bridge Due To Erosion | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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DDOT To Close Kalmia Road Bridge Due To Erosion

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The Kalmia Road bridge is succumbing to erosion, prompting DDOT to act.
Martin Di Caro
The Kalmia Road bridge is succumbing to erosion, prompting DDOT to act.

View West Beach Dr NW & Kalmia Rd NW in a larger map

The 17,000 daily motorists who use a certain road to get across Rock Creek Park in Northwest D.C. will have to use detours starting tomorrow.

The culvert under Kalmia Road NW connecting East Beach Drive and West Beach Drive is so badly eroded, the District Department of Transportation is closing the bridge tomorrow after the morning rush hour for about six months for bridge replacement work, according to Muhammed Khalid, DDOT's deputy chief engineer.

He says the Kalmia Road bridge and culvert are 70 years old and were slated to be worked on in late November, but recent deterioration has created a "scour hole" that has prompted DDOT to act before the next storm.

"The water flow has been creating this energy that is destroying the structure," Khalid says.

DDOT will have detours for commuters traveling both east and west across Rock Creek Park while pre-fabricated bridge structures are put in place.

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