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D.C. Lost Millions During Shutdown, But True Cost Will Be Known In December

It is estimated the District lost millions in sales tax revenue as hotel rooms and restaurant tables stayed empty because federal workers and tourists stayed home during the federal government shutdown.

But at a D.C. Council hearing on Friday, the city's chief economist, Fitzroy Lee, said all the numbers aren't in yet. He pointed out that while furloughed workers lost wages, they will receive back pay—and the city will get income tax revenue.

"Unfortunately we are not going to know the actually revenue impact until December," he said.

City Administrator Allen Lew said the District's contingency fund was spent to pay employees.

"At the beginning of the shutdown there was approximately $150 million dollars available in the contingency reserve fund. The office of the Chief Financial Officer estimated that the District spends approximately $10 million per day on employees salaries," he said.

The fund has since been mostly replenished. D.C. incurred no major expenses during the shutdown, other than spending about $100,000 picking up trash on federal park lands—money that D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray won't be asking to be reimbursed.

NPR

He Died At 32, But A Young Artist Lives On In LA's Underground Museum

When Noah Davis founded the museum, he wanted to bring world-class art to a neighborhood he likened to a food desert, meaning no grocery stores or museums. Davis died a year ago Monday.
NPR

The Strange, Twisted Story Behind Seattle's Blackberries

Those tangled brambles are everywhere in the city, the legacy of an eccentric named Luther Burbank whose breeding experiments with crops can still be found on many American dinner plates.
WAMU 88.5

State Taxes, School Budgets And The Quality Of Public Education

Budget cutbacks have made it impossible for many states to finance their public schools. But some have bucked the trend by increasing taxes and earmarking those funds for education. Taxes, spending and the quality of public education.

NPR

Surfers And Scientists Team Up To Create The 'Perfect Wave'

Surfers once deemed man-made waves weak and mushy compared to the best that break along the coast. Then engineers and an 11-time world champion surfer showed just how good an artificial wave can be.

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