Marine Corps Marathon Participants Run For Navy Yard Victims | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Marine Corps Marathon Participants Run For Navy Yard Victims

Over 30,000 people participated in this year's Marine Corps Marathon.
Jacob Fenston
Over 30,000 people participated in this year's Marine Corps Marathon.

As 30,000 runners filled the streets of D.C. and Arlington today for the Marine Corps Marathon, one local group of runners raced to honor victims of the Navy Yard shooting.

Runner Adam Rehman works as a budget analyst at the Navy Yard. He works across the street from building 197 — the building, where on September 16, the Navy Yard shooter took 12 lives.

"My mom actually works in building 197, so, I was really nervous when she wasn't answering her phone," he says.

His mother was fine. But he wanted to do something to honor those who were killed. He and six others who work at the Navy Yard decided on running the Marine Corps Marathon. But they didn't have a lot of time to train.

"I wasn't planning on running the marathon a month ago," he says.

Jason Lee signed up, even though he wasn't in shape.

"I wanted to tangibly do something, instead of just, continue to go back to work."

So far, the Navy Yard team has raised about $3,000, which will go to the families of the 12 who were killed last month.

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