WAMU 88.5 : News

Marine Corps Marathon Participants Run For Navy Yard Victims

Over 30,000 people participated in this year's Marine Corps Marathon.
Jacob Fenston
Over 30,000 people participated in this year's Marine Corps Marathon.

As 30,000 runners filled the streets of D.C. and Arlington today for the Marine Corps Marathon, one local group of runners raced to honor victims of the Navy Yard shooting.

Runner Adam Rehman works as a budget analyst at the Navy Yard. He works across the street from building 197 — the building, where on September 16, the Navy Yard shooter took 12 lives.

"My mom actually works in building 197, so, I was really nervous when she wasn't answering her phone," he says.

His mother was fine. But he wanted to do something to honor those who were killed. He and six others who work at the Navy Yard decided on running the Marine Corps Marathon. But they didn't have a lot of time to train.

"I wasn't planning on running the marathon a month ago," he says.

Jason Lee signed up, even though he wasn't in shape.

"I wanted to tangibly do something, instead of just, continue to go back to work."

So far, the Navy Yard team has raised about $3,000, which will go to the families of the 12 who were killed last month.

WAMU 88.5

Anne Tyler: "A Spool Of Blue Thread" (Rebroadcast)

In her first live radio interview ever, Pulitzer Prize winning author Anne Tyler joins Diane to talk about her 20th novel, "A Spool of Blue Thread."


Fine Brine From Appalachia: The Fancy Mountain Salt That Chefs Prize

An artisanal salt producer is processing brine from ancient ocean deposits below West Virgina's mountains. The company, J.Q. Dickinson Salt-Works, ships to top chefs who value the salt's minerality.

Downed Russian Warplane Highlights Regional Divide On Syria

Hugh Pope, director of communications and outreach at the International Crisis Group in Brussels, explains the growing divide between Turkey and Russia on their priorities inside Syria.

From Takeout To Breakups: Apps Can Deliver Anything, For A Price

Convenience is at an all-time premium — and a lot of smartphone apps promise to make many of the things we do every day easier. In a time-crunch or sheer laziness, how far will the apps take us?

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.