WAMU 88.5 : News

Marine Corps Marathon Participants Run For Navy Yard Victims

Over 30,000 people participated in this year's Marine Corps Marathon.
Jacob Fenston
Over 30,000 people participated in this year's Marine Corps Marathon.

As 30,000 runners filled the streets of D.C. and Arlington today for the Marine Corps Marathon, one local group of runners raced to honor victims of the Navy Yard shooting.

Runner Adam Rehman works as a budget analyst at the Navy Yard. He works across the street from building 197 — the building, where on September 16, the Navy Yard shooter took 12 lives.

"My mom actually works in building 197, so, I was really nervous when she wasn't answering her phone," he says.

His mother was fine. But he wanted to do something to honor those who were killed. He and six others who work at the Navy Yard decided on running the Marine Corps Marathon. But they didn't have a lot of time to train.

"I wasn't planning on running the marathon a month ago," he says.

Jason Lee signed up, even though he wasn't in shape.

"I wanted to tangibly do something, instead of just, continue to go back to work."

So far, the Navy Yard team has raised about $3,000, which will go to the families of the 12 who were killed last month.

NPR

Yaya Alafia's Songs Of Strength For Her Baby Boy

2013 was a big year for actress and model Yaya Alafia. She starred in three films and had a baby boy. Alafia shares the songs reflecting those experiences for Tell Me More's series 'In Your Ear.'
NPR

Bake Bread Like A Pioneer In Appalachia ... With No Yeast

Bacteria can make a bread rise and give it a cheesy flavor. That's the secret ingredient in salt rising bread, which dates to the late 1700s in Appalachia, when bakers didn't have yeast on hand.
NPR

Obama Assures Japan Of U.S. Security Commitment

The president is on the first stop in an eight-day trip to Asia that also will see him visit Malaysia, the Philippines and South Korea.
NPR

The Price War Over The Cloud Has High Stakes For The Internet

Amazon, Google, Microsoft and others are competing to be the main landlords of the cloud. Their terms and prices could control who gets to build what on the Internet, and for how much.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.