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Thousands Visit D.C. Health Insurance Exchange, But Few Have Purchased Plans

The District's health insurance exchange website has drawn thousands of visitors since launching on Oct. 1, though few residents have purchased insurance plans so far.

As of Monday, 12,294 people created accounts on D.C. Health Link, the website created as part of President Obama's Affordable Care Act, according to the D.C. Health Benefit Exchange Authority.

But of those accounts created, only 1,894 applications have been fully submitted, 321 individuals and families have chosen plans, and 164 have requested an invoice for their first month's premium. Thirty-four plans are available for individuals and families to choose from.

According to the authority, 426 small businesses also created accounts.

Uninsured D.C. residents have until Dec. 15 to choose and pay for a plan, ahead of the Jan. 1 deadline for the law's mandate that all Americans have health insurance. According to the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 11 percent of D.C. residents are uninsured, one of the lowest rates in the country.

Fourteen states, including D.C., are running their own health insurances exchanges, while the remaining 36 are relying on a troubled website set up by the federal government.


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