NPR : News

Filed Under:

Modest Job Growth, No Change In Unemployment Rate Expected

Update at 8:35 a.m. ET. The Report Is Out:

Fewer Jobs Than Expected In Sept., But Jobless Rate Fell

Our original post follows:

Two and a half weeks late because of the partial government shutdown, the Bureau of Labor Statistics' report on job growth and unemployment in September is due at 8:30 a.m. ET.

As NPR's Chris Arnold said on Morning Edition, economists expect to hear the jobless rate was unchanged, at 7.3 percent, and that employers added about 180,000 jobs to their payrolls in September. This would be slightly more than were added in August — if the preliminary estimate for that month isn't changed from the 169,000 that BLS reported earlier.

On Morning Edition, Chris also talked about how job growth has been slowed because many employers are nervous about hiring. They're bothered by what's been happening in Washington, where policymakers don't seem able to come to agreement on a consistent economic policy. Some economists say about 900,000 more jobs might have been added to payrolls in recent years "if politicians were doing a better job of charting a course forward," Chris said.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

He Died At 32, But A Young Artist Lives On In LA's Underground Museum

When Noah Davis founded the museum, he wanted to bring world-class art to a neighborhood he likened to a food desert, meaning no grocery stores or museums. Davis died a year ago Monday.
NPR

The Strange, Twisted Story Behind Seattle's Blackberries

Those tangled brambles are everywhere in the city, the legacy of an eccentric named Luther Burbank whose breeding experiments with crops can still be found on many American dinner plates.
WAMU 88.5

State Taxes, School Budgets And The Quality Of Public Education

Budget cutbacks have made it impossible for many states to finance their public schools. But some have bucked the trend by increasing taxes and earmarking those funds for education. Taxes, spending and the quality of public education.

NPR

Surfers And Scientists Team Up To Create The 'Perfect Wave'

Surfers once deemed man-made waves weak and mushy compared to the best that break along the coast. Then engineers and an 11-time world champion surfer showed just how good an artificial wave can be.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.