Former House Aide Lorraine Miller Named Interim NAACP Chief | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Former House Aide Lorraine Miller Named Interim NAACP Chief

The NAACP has selected Lorraine Miller, a former clerk at the House of Representatives, to the post of interim president and CEO to replace Benjamin Jealous.

The organization, the nation's largest and oldest civil rights group, made the announcement of Miller's appointment at its board meeting over the weekend.

Miller, a Fort Worth, Texas, native, was a "long-time aide to top Washington Democrats and the nation's first African-American clerk of the House," according to The Fort Worth Star-Telegram:

"Miller, who divides her time between Washington and Fort Worth, first came to Washington to work for her local congressman, U.S. Rep. Jim Wright, D-Fort Worth. Wright rose to become speaker and Miller worked in the House and then in the Clinton Administration before returning to work for Rep. Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., who, as speaker in 2007, named Miller Clerk of the House. Miller stayed in the position until the GOP re-took control of the U.S. House in 2011."

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