NPR : News

Filed Under:

UPDATE: N.J. Gov. Christie Won't Fight Gay Marriage Ruling

"Gov. Chris Christie announced today that he was dropping the fight against same-sex marriage in New Jersey by withdrawing his appeal of a major case that was being heard by the state Supreme Court," The Star-Ledger writes.

Christie's office has released a copy if its court filing, in which it officially withdraws its appeal.

So it would seem that same-sex marriages, which began early Monday in the state thanks to a court ruling issued Friday, will continue.

Colin Reed, a spokesman for the Republican governor, tells the Star-Ledger that "although the governor strongly disagrees with the court substituting its judgment for the constitutional process of the elected branches or a vote of the people, the court has now spoken clearly as to their view of the New Jersey Constitution and, therefore, same-sex marriage is the law. The governor will do his constitutional duty and ensure his administration enforces the law as dictated by the New Jersey Supreme Court."

Our original post — "Tears Of Joy As Same-Sex Marriages Begin In New Jersey":

Minutes after midnight, as Sunday turned into Monday, gay couples in towns and cities across New Jersey said their "I do's" as the state became the 14th to allow same-sex marriages.

The legal path was cleared for them Friday, as we reported, when the state's Supreme Court rejected a request to halt such ceremonies.

In Newark early Monday, Mayor Cory Booker (a Democrat who last week won a special election for the U.S. Senate) declared "it is officially past midnight, [and] marriage is equal in New Jersey," as he began a series of ceremonies in city hall.

According to The Star-Ledger:

"At one point, the event took a particularly emotional turn. As Booker married Gabriela Celeiro and Liz Salerno, the two held each other and got teary.

" 'There's some law about making a mayor cry, ' he joked. 'It's illegal.'

"He later said he had to collect himself before marrying the next couple."

There was at least one demonstrator at Newark's city hall. The Associated Press says "there was a brief disruption from a protester who cried out, 'This is unlawful in the eyes of God and Jesus Christ.' "

According to the Star-Ledger, police removed the man. Then there was applause when Booker resumed the ceremony by saying: "not hearing any substantive and worthy objections ..."

The New York Times writes that "in Lambertville, N.J., the marriage certificate of Beth Asaro and Joanne Schailey allowed only for a 'bride' and a 'groom,' so Ms. Asaro — in a pink suit — was listed as the groom, and Ms. Schailey — in a black suit — as the bride. ... So it went on Sunday night in towns across New Jersey, where a judge's ruling that the state must allow same-sex couples to marry went into effect just after midnight on Monday, capping a weekend-long frenzy of flower-arranging, Champagne-spraying, hair-styling, ring-buying and cake-baking. "

The Times says "hundreds of people ... rushed to make wedding arrangements over the weekend."

For an explainer on "gay marriage in New Jersey," click here.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Lisa Lucas Takes The Reins At The National Book Foundation

Lucas is the third executive director in the history of the foundation, which runs the National Book Awards. Her priority? Inclusivity: "Everyone is either a reader or a potential reader," she says.
NPR

The Shocking Truth About America's Ethanol Law: It Doesn't Matter (For Now)

Ted Cruz doesn't like the law that requires the use of ethanol in gasoline. So what would happen if it was abolished? The surprising answer: not much, probably.
WAMU 88.5

The Latest on the Military, Political and Humanitarian Crises in Syria

Russia continues airstrikes in Syria. Secretary Kerry meets with world leaders in an attempt to resolve the country’s five-year civil war. A panel joins Diane to discuss the latest on the military, political and humanitarian crises facing Syria.

NPR

Twitter Tries A New Kind Of Timeline By Predicting What May Interest You

Twitter has struggled to attract new users. Its latest effort at rejuvenation is a new kind of timeline that predicts which older posts you might not want to miss and displays them on top.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.