Post-Shutdown, Local Republicans To Continue Fight Against Obamacare | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Post-Shutdown, Local Republicans To Continue Fight Against Obamacare

Lawmakers just ended one battle that cost the region millions of dollars, but now Republicans in the region are getting ready for the next battle over the health law.

Analysts say this region took the biggest economic hit because of the government shutdown, yet more than half of the region’s Republicans voted against the deal to reopen it. Virginia Congressman Morgan Griffith opposed the measure because it funded so-called Obamacare. He admits his party hasn’t gained any leverage in the fight to undo the health law, but he says that can change.

“I don’t know—time will tell. I don’t have any confidence today that that will be the case, but politics is an interesting study and interesting science and things change rapidly, so we’ll see," he says.

Griffith isn’t surrendering. He says he’s ready to make the same demands in the next round of the budget battle.

“But we are where we’re at and we go on to fight another time," he says.

Besides Griffith, three other Virginia Republicans opposed the deal to turn the government’s lights on and avoid a potential default: Randy Forbes, Robert Hurt and Bob Goodlatte, along with Andy Harris of Maryland.

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