NPR : News

Filed Under:

Chinatowns: A Little Bit Of Beijing, Wherever You Are

This story about the once-thriving Chinatown in Kolkata, India, caught our eye. Chinese migrants arrived in the area in the 19th century. As recently as 2000, there were 10,000 Chinese living there. That number is now 2,000.

But as Deutsche Welle reports that there is an effort to reverse the trend.

"Earlier this year, following representations by some eminent citizens and the Indian National Trust for Art and Cultural Heritage, a proposal was sent to restore and renovate Chinatown and promote tourism there," the report said. "The local government has also agreed to partner in the project."

It's still not clear how this will play out, but it made us want to check in on some other places with Chinatowns.

There is, of course, the Chinatown in Lagos, Nigeria, that NPR's Frank Langfitt reported on in 2011. But many of the Chinatowns in unlikely places have seen better days — such as this one in Havana.

But others are thriving, such as this one in Jakarta, Indonesia...

... and this one in Johannesburg, South Africa...

... and the one in Singapore.

Do you have a favorite Chinatown? Let us know in the comments below.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

WAMU 88.5

Remains In Jamestown Linked To Early Colonial Leaders

Scientists from the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History and The Jamestown Rediscovery Foundation say they've identified four men buried in the earliest English church in America.
WAMU 88.5

The Democracy Of The Diner

Whether the decor is faux '50s silver and neon or authentic greasy spoon, diners are classic Americana, down to the familiar menu items. Rich, poor, black, white--all rub shoulders in the vinyl booths and at formica counters. We explore the enduring appeal and nostalgia of the diner.

WAMU 88.5

D.C. Council Member David Grosso

D.C. Council Member and Chair of the Committee on Education David Grosso joins us to discuss local public policy issues, including the challenges facing D.C. Public Schools.

NPR

Researchers Warn Against 'Autonomous Weapons' Arms Race

Already, researcher Stuart Russell says, sentry robots in South Korea "can spot and track a human being for a distance of 2 miles — and can very accurately kill that person."

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.