House Stenographer Seizes Microphone In Bizarre Rant | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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House Stenographer Seizes Microphone In Bizarre Rant

In one of the strangest moments of a strange few weeks on Capitol Hill, a House stenographer broke into a rant about God, the Constitution and Freemasonry as representatives cast their votes Wednesday on a deal to reopen the government.

"He will not be mocked," the stenographer, later identified as Dianne Reidy, yelled into the microphone at the chamber's rostrum. "The greatest deception here is that this is not one nation under God. It never was. It would not have been. The Constitution would not have been written by Freemasons. They go against God."

She was quickly escorted away from the lectern by floor staff, but continued: "You cannot serve two masters. Praise be to God. Praise be to Jesus."

Capitol Police said Reidy had been "transported to a local area hospital for evaluation."

Rep. Gerry Connolly, a Virginia Democrat, was quoted by The Washington Post as saying the stenographer is a well-known and liked figure in the House.

"I think there's a lot of sympathy because something clearly happened there," Connolly said.

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