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Only Days After Being Chosen As Running Mate, Ivey Turns To Defending Gansler

In Maryland, Doug Gansler's running mate is defending him amidst a swirl of controversies for the attorney general as he seeks to become the state's next governor.

Gansler tapped Prince George's County Delegate Jolene Ivey earlier this week to be his running mate. She says the controversy over Gansler's use of his state police escort during his time as attorney general, and his earlier comments about his chief opponent Lieutenant Governor Anthony Brown's race, never deterred her from taking the number two slot on the ticket.

Ivey herself is African-American and says Gansler's remark that Brown is running solely on his race in order to become Maryland's first black governor was not racist. If it was, Ivey says she would not have accepted Gansler's invitation to be his running mate.

"It was really not about race at all. If you look at what Doug Gansler was saying, he was saying that the other candidate is not running on any issues. He's only running on something that he has nothing to do with. Which is his race," she said.

Brown's campaign demanded Gansler apologize, which he refused to do.

WAMU 88.5

Rita Dove: "Collected Poems: 1974 - 2004"

A conversation with Rita Dove, former U.S. poet laureate and Pulitzer Prize-winner.

NPR

Frozen Food Fears: 4 Things To Know About The Listeria Recall

The FDA issued a massive recall of frozen fruits and vegetables this week. Here's what you need to know about the nasty bug that's causing all the problems.
WAMU 88.5

Back From The Breach: Moving The Federal Workforce Forward

A year after a massive cyber breach compromised the databases of the Office of Personnel Management, Kojo talks with OPM Acting Director Beth Cobert about her agency and key issues facing the federal workforce.

WAMU 88.5

Why Medical Error Is The Third Leading Cause Of Death In The U.S.

New research shows medical error is the third leading cause of death in the U.S., killing more than 250,000 people a year. Why there are so many mistakes, and what can be done to improve patient safety.

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