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VT Vs. UT Game Expected To Break Attendance Record

On Monday, Virginia Tech and the University of Tennessee are expected to announce the details of a football game between the two schools that could set an attendance record for the sport.

The two schools will play each other in 2016 at Bristol Motor Speedway in Tennessee, a track that hosts many races including two for NASCAR's Sprint Cup series. Its capacity for races is 160,000, meaning if the stands are full for the Hokies-Volunteers contest, it would set an attendance record not just for American football, but for all American team sports.

The previous record for American football is 115,000, set two years ago when Notre Dame played at the University of Michigan. Rumors of such a Virginia Tech-Tennessee game have been flying for close to a decade, as Bristol sits almost equidistant between the campuses of both schools.

There will be a lot of logistical challenges in the ensuing three years, namely how to place a grass field in the asphalt oval of the roughly half-mile track. But this wouldn't be the first football game at Bristol.

In 1961, the Redskins faced the Philadelphia Eagles in an NFL pre-season game there.


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