NPR : News

Top Stories: Nobel Peace Prize; Movement (Maybe) On Shutdown

Good morning, here are our early stories:

-- Chemical Weapons Watchdog Gets Nobel Peace Prize

-- No Deal Yet, But Maybe An Opening

And here are more early headlines:

Syria's Rebels Executed Civilians, Say Human Rights Watch (BBC)

Utah's National Parks Will Reopen Despite Ongoing Government Shutdown (CNN)

Jury Clears Toyota In Wrongful-Death Lawsuit (The Los Angeles Times)

Castro's Guards Shirked And Lied, Reports Say (The Columbus Dispatch)

Massive Cyclone Approaches India's East Coast, Thousands Flee (CBC)

Pervez Musharraf Remanded To Judicial Custody For 14 Days (The Indian Express)

Gang War In Brazil's Pedrinhas Jail Kills 13 (BBC)

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