Shutdown Enters Day 10, Local Economy Continues To Suffer | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Shutdown Enters Day 10, Local Economy Continues To Suffer

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Federal workers are going to get back pay once the government starts running at full speed. But many report slowing their spending while many contractors aren't expecting any back pay. More than 300,000 of those furloughed workers hail from this region, according to Maryland Democratic Sen. Ben Cardin.

"These are people," says Cardin. "Each one has a family. Each one represents harm that's been done as a result of the shutdown."

On top of the shutdown, lawmakers are now haggling over raising the debt ceiling, which threatens the Triple A bond ratings of Virginia and Maryland. Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va. says congressional gridlock could cripple the region.

"In Virginia, close to 40 to 50 percent of our budget are federal pass through dollars," says Warner. "If those dollars don't come, you will have defaults of communities and states all across the nation."

While Capitol Hill has seen its fair share of press conferences since the shutdown began, it seems the two sides continue to speak past each other.

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