Shelter For Runaway Youths The Latest Victim Of Shutdown | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Shelter For Runaway Youths The Latest Victim Of Shutdown

Members of Congress don't have to look far to see the impact of the shutdown: it has forced D.C.'s only shelter for homeless and runaway youth to furlough nearly 50 employees and cut most of its services.

The Sasha Bruce Youthwork — a non-profit on Capitol Hill — is being forced to furlough nearly half its staff staff and close six programs, including its outreach services, which provide food and clothing to young people living on the streets.

Also cut: after-school tutoring, job training, and AIDS prevention and testing.

In a statement, founder Deborah Shore says: "It is hard enough that the federal government does not deem services for runaway and homeless youth as essential, but worse is that our essential local dollars are being frozen as the cold weather approaches."

Shore says that for the time being, Sasha Bruce will continue to operate its housing programs "because the young people have no other place to go."

But she says if the shutdown continues, "more youth will be living outside, unprotected."

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