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Without Federal Funding, Shelter For Victims Of Domestic Violence Struggles

A group that helps domestic violence victims in the District is bracing for budget cuts that could fall on them because of the government shutdown.

While this is Domestic Violence Awareness Month, Congressional gridlock may lead to vital funding cuts for the only shelter in the city that helps families right after domestic violence is reported.

Relying on a mix of federal and local dollars and donations, D.C. Safe served more than 5,000 victims last year, according to its director Natalia Otero. She says they just learned the federal aid is set to expire today because of the government shutdown.

"Last night we house 17 families in our emergency shelter and 50 children, and those are people in desperate need of emergency services and shouldn't suffer just because of politics," Otero says.

Otero is going through the process of getting a waiver, but it could be a long process. So in the meantime, they're working on contingency plans.

"There's a potential if this continues for any more time that we'll have to run with a skeleton staff, how to ask our community to come in and pitch in, to volunteer," she says.

Otero says D.C. Safe needs to raise $19,000 this week to keep its doors open. You can make a donation on their website at DCSafe.org.

NPR

MTV's Rewinding The '90s With A New Channel

The '90s are back! Pokémon has taken over the world again. A Clinton is running for president. And now, MTV is reviving '90s favorites like Beavis and Butt-head on a new channel, MTV Classic.
NPR

Cookie Dough Blues: How E. Coli Is Sneaking Into Our Forbidden Snack

Most people know not to eat raw cookie dough. But now it's serious: 46 people have now been sickened with E. coli-tainted flour. Here's how contamination might be occurring.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour – LIVE from Slim's Diner!

This special edition of the Politics Hour is coming to you live from Slim's Diner from Petworth in Northwest D.C.

NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

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