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The Votes Are In: Sandy Hook Elementary Will Be Torn Down

In a referendum marked by a large turnout and an emphatic result, the people of Newtown, Conn., have voted to demolish Sandy Hook Elementary and build a new school. Sandy Hook was the scene of a mass shooting last December, when 20 children and six staff members were killed.

Saturday's vote asked citizens to decide whether to take nearly $50 million in state money to fund the demolition of Sandy Hook and the planning and construction of a new school on essentially the same site.

"The vote was 4,504 yes to 558 no. The registrar of voters said Saturday's referendum had the highest voter turnout the town has seen since the 2008 presidential election," reports the News Times.

"I thought it was going to pass by at least 80 percent, but it's more like 90 percent. It's time to bring our children home," Selectman James Gaston Sr. tells the Newtown Bee.

Since the attack, former students of Sandy Hook Elementary have been attending school in nearby Monroe, Conn.

"This was another hurdle overcome," Board of Education Chair Debbie Leidlein tells the Bee. "Now we're ready. We've got great plans moving forward to bring our families home."

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Barbershop: UofL Basketball Ban, Football Concussions And The NFL Women's Summit

ESPN contributor Kevin Blackistone, Bloomberg View's Kavitha Davidson and The Washington Post's Wesley Lowery talk about the UofL basketball team, public opinion of the NFL, and women in sports.
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After Introducing Changes, Keurig Sales Continue To Fall

Despite America's high coffee consumption, Keurig reported disappointing sales this week. Even during its popular holiday selling period, the numbers haven't perked up in recent years.
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On The Clock: Rubio Gets The Most Talking Time In Tonight's Debate

It was the last debate before the New Hampshire primary and Donald Trump was back onstage. Which GOP candidate ended up with the most talking time?
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How Limited Internet Access Can Subtract From Kids' Education

Smartphones are often credited with helping bridge the "digital divide" between people who do and don't have Internet access at home. But is mobile Internet enough for a family with a kid in school?

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