Analysis: Lawmakers Praise Capitol Police Response To Shooting Incident | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Analysis: Lawmakers Praise Capitol Police Response To Shooting Incident

We're learning more about the woman authorities say drove into a barrier at the White House yesterday before leading police on a chase through downtown Washington. Two law enforcement officials identified the driver as 34-year-old Miriam Carey, of Stamford, Conn. Her mother tells ABC news Carey was suffering from Postpartum Depression. Lawmakers inside were talking of course about the ongoing government shutdown. David Hawkings, writer of the Hawkings Here column for Roll Call, talks about some of the details.

On the Capitol Police's response to yesterday's shooting incident in D.C., and how they are not being paid:

"They [Capitol Police] are considered essential. Before the incident happened, I was in the Capital right before this [the shooting] happened, talking about the pay situation, which I checked with other officials later. As I understand it, they are being treated like other government employees, which is to say they have been promised they will be paid, but no paycheck has been written until the government is reopened."

On lawmakers' praise for Capitol police yesterday:

"There was a standing ovation on the House floor, after this incident was over. At least one senator said this is a national disgrace, and they should be paid immediately. There was some rumbling at the Capitol yesterday that maybe another one of these mini bills might be reopened for the Capitol police."

On when the shutdown might end:

"With each passing day, the likelihood that the debt ceiling debate and the "reopen the government" debate become one debate... and that debt limit deadline, as the Treasury says, is two weeks from now -- on October 17... with each passing day, it looks likelier that that will be the one deadline, which means essentially the shutdown will stay in effect until mid-October."

NPR

'The Bishop's Wife' Tracks A Killer In A Mormon Community

The mystery about the disappearance of a young Mormon woman was inspired by a real-life story. Author Mette Ivie Harrison talks about her own struggles with faith and stereotypes of Mormon mothers.
NPR

Nutmeg Spice Has A Secret Story That Isn't So Nice

Nutmeg is a feel-good holiday spice. But it once caused serious bloodshed and may have even been a reason the Dutch were willing to part with Manhattan in the 1600s.
WAMU 88.5

Special Prosecutors Should Handle Civilian Shootings By Police, Holmes Norton Says

Norton says mayors and governors could stem anger over civilian shootings by police by appointing special prosecutors to handle them.
NPR

Facebook Finds That Not All Users Like The 'Year In Review' App

The social media giant's "Year in Review" app has upset some who prefer to forget 2014's unpleasant memories.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.