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Tribe To Protest Redskins Name During NFL Meeting In D.C.

Critics say the Redskins' team name is racist, but the team's owner has refused to change it.
Keith Allison
Critics say the Redskins' team name is racist, but the team's owner has refused to change it.

An Indian tribe from upstate New York that's campaigning against the Washington Redskins' nickname says it will hold a public meeting about the issue on the football team's home turf at the same Washington hotel where the NFL is holding its fall meeting.

The Oneida Indian Nation's symposium is scheduled for Monday, the day NFL owners start arriving for Tuesday's meeting. Tribal leader Ray Halbritter says the meeting's time and place provide a great opportunity to bring more understanding about the issue of why the Redskins name is considered offensive by many people.

He says NFL officials would be invited to attend the symposium.

There's no immediate comment from the NFL.

The Oneidas are pushing for the Redskins to change their name as the team faces fresh waves of criticism over its nickname.

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