WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

D.C. Council Passes Bill Banning Smoking Within 25 Feet Of Parks, Bus Stops

Are you standing 24 feet from a D.C. bus stop? Then you can't smoke.
Elvert Barnes: http://www.flickr.com/photos/perspective/6009966019/
Are you standing 24 feet from a D.C. bus stop? Then you can't smoke.

If you're a smoker in D.C., you'll soon have fewer places to feed your habit.

On Tuesday the D.C. Council passed a bill forbidding smoking within 25 feet of city playgrounds, parks, recreation centers and bus stops. There are some 300 parks, playgrounds and recreation centers within city limits, as well as hundreds of bus stops.

The bill won't apply to federal parks, homeowners who live within 25 feet of a park, playground, recreation centers, or bus stops. It also exempts cigar and hookah bars, as well as some bars and restaurants and patios.

Smoking has been banned in bars and restaurants since 2007, and D.C. allows building owners to post no-smoking signs at their entrances, requiring smokers to stand at least 25 feet away. George Washington University's campuses and American University went smoke free this year and the Georgetown University Medical Center campus currently prohibits smoking.

Earlier this year Montgomery County passed a smoking ban at bus stops and bus shelters.

In related news, Council member Yvette Alexander (D-Ward 7) introduced a bill that would ban smoking in cars carrying any passenger under the age of 12.

NPR

Jack Davis, Cartoonist Who Helped Found 'Mad' Magazine, Dies

Money from a job illustrating a Coca-Cola training manual became a springboard for Jack Davis to move from Georgia to New York.
NPR

Cookie Dough Blues: How E. Coli Is Sneaking Into Our Forbidden Snack

Most people know not to eat raw cookie dough. But now it's serious: 46 people have now been sickened with E. coli-tainted flour. Here's how contamination might be occurring.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour – LIVE from Slim's Diner!

This special edition of the Politics Hour is coming to you live from Slim's Diner from Petworth in Northwest D.C.

NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.