D.C. Council Passes Bill Banning Smoking Within 25 Feet Of Parks, Bus Stops | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

D.C. Council Passes Bill Banning Smoking Within 25 Feet Of Parks, Bus Stops

Are you standing 24 feet from a D.C. bus stop? Then you can't smoke.
Elvert Barnes: http://www.flickr.com/photos/perspective/6009966019/
Are you standing 24 feet from a D.C. bus stop? Then you can't smoke.

If you're a smoker in D.C., you'll soon have fewer places to feed your habit.

On Tuesday the D.C. Council passed a bill forbidding smoking within 25 feet of city playgrounds, parks, recreation centers and bus stops. There are some 300 parks, playgrounds and recreation centers within city limits, as well as hundreds of bus stops.

The bill won't apply to federal parks, homeowners who live within 25 feet of a park, playground, recreation centers, or bus stops. It also exempts cigar and hookah bars, as well as some bars and restaurants and patios.

Smoking has been banned in bars and restaurants since 2007, and D.C. allows building owners to post no-smoking signs at their entrances, requiring smokers to stand at least 25 feet away. George Washington University's campuses and American University went smoke free this year and the Georgetown University Medical Center campus currently prohibits smoking.

Earlier this year Montgomery County passed a smoking ban at bus stops and bus shelters.

In related news, Council member Yvette Alexander (D-Ward 7) introduced a bill that would ban smoking in cars carrying any passenger under the age of 12.

NPR

Director Mike Nichols Remembered As A Comedian, Raconteur, Charmer

Robert Siegel remembers director and film icon Mike Nichols, who died Wednesday of a heart attack at 83.
NPR

How To Catch A Cattle Thief

Cattle theft has been making a major comeback. A drought in the West has meant higher beef prices, making cattle an attractive target for thieves.
NPR

At GOP Governors Meeting, Immigration Casts A Wide Shadow

After a successful 2014 election season, the nation's GOP governors gathered to talk about policy issues and bask in their victories. But President Obama's immigration plans dominated the discussion.
NPR

Keep Your Head Up: 'Text Neck' Takes A Toll On The Spine

Newly published research finds that common texting posture can put as much as 60 pounds of force on the cervical spine.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.