Tom Clancy, Master Of Military Techno-Thrillers, Dies | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Filed Under:

Tom Clancy, Master Of Military Techno-Thrillers, Dies

Tom Clancy, the best-selling writer of such "techno-thrillers" as The Hunt for Red October, Red Storm Rising and Patriot Games, has died.

He was 66.

The news of his death was first reported in tweets from Publishers Weekly and New York Times books reporter Julie Bosman. It was confirmed to NPR Wednesday morning in a statement from his publisher, G.P. Putnam's Sons.

Clancy lived in Maryland. According to the Baltimore Sun, he "died Tuesday after a brief illness at the Johns Hopkins Hospital."

Bosman of the Times writes that Ivan Held, president of Putnam publishers, says Clancy "was a thrill to work with."

As the Times wrote in 1988, Clancy was an "insurance agent turned supernovelist" who made the U.S. military "the real hero of his fast-paced, carefully researched techno-thrillers."

Putnam's says "Clancy's blockbuster debut novel, The Hunt for Red October, was published in 1984. Command Authority, Clancy's 17th novel, is due out from G.P. Putnam's Sons in December 2013."

In 2002, Clancy sat down with C-SPAN to talk about books and take calls from viewers.

Watch for more on him from our friends on NPR's books beat.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

As Summer Winds Down, Wistful Dreams Of A 'Lost Estate'

The scent of fresh pencils is in the air, and homework assignments are around the corner. In honor of back-to-school season, author Alexander Aciman recommends The Lost Estate by Henri Alain-Fournier.
NPR

A Food Crisis Follows Africa's Ebola Crisis

Food shortages are emerging in the wake of West Africa's Ebola epidemic. Market shelves are bare and fields are neglected because traders can't move and social gatherings are discouraged.
NPR

Obama's Reaction To Ferguson Raises Questions About President's Role

As the situation quiets down in Ferguson, Mo., some political observers are asking why it took President Obama so long to publicly weigh in on events there.
NPR

Coming Soon To A Pole Near You: A Bike That Locks Itself

Cyclists may soon have a convenient way to discourage bike thieves, thanks to new designs that use parts of the bikes themselves as locks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.