WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Options Public Charter School Managers Accused Of $3M In Graft

District officials have filed a lawsuit against the managers of Options Public Charter School. Those managers are accused of diverting more than $3 million in taxpayer funds to themselves and two for-profit companies they founded while running the school.

The lawsuit alleges three of the school's former managers — Donna Montgomery, David Cranford and Paul Dalton — used the school as a "cash generating machine" by funneling money to their two companies and benefitting from a "pattern of self-dealing."

The school enrolls approximately 400 at-risk middle and high school students.

The District alleges Options Public charter school also paid bonuses to the three managers that were "unreasonable and inconsistent with the school's non-profit purpose." For example, according to the suit, Montgomery made more than $425,000 in public funds in one year, "more than the President of the United States and more than twice the salary of the Mayor of District of Columbia".

The District wants to freeze some manager's assets and also wants the school to be placed in receivership.

The lawsuit also names J.C. Hayward in the complaint for signing off on these agreements. She's the former chair of the school's board of trustees and a WUSA 9 anchor.

NPR

Far From 'Infinitesimal': A Mathematical Paradox's Role In History

It seems like a simple question: How many parts can you divide a line into? The troublesome answer was square at the root of two of Europe's greatest social crises.
NPR

Soup to Nuts, Restaurants Smoke It All

While you won't find cigarettes in restaurants anymore, some smoking isn't banned. It's not just meat, either; it's hot to smoke just about anything edible.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Remains At Odds With Feds On Medicaid Expansion

Lawmakers in Virginia continue to resist the $9.6 billion Medicaid expansion on offer from the federal government as part of the Affordable Care Act.

NPR

Watch For The Blind Lets You Feel Time Passing

A new watch allows the blind to feel time on their wrists. Designer Hyungsoo Kim tells NPR's Wade Goodwyn his watch allows users to tell time accurately without revealing their disabilities.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.