Metro To Remain Open During Government Shutdown | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Metro To Remain Open During Government Shutdown

The federal government could be closing its doors, but Metro is keeping doors on trains and buses open to commuters, whether or not they have a job to go to.

The regional transit agency announced this morning that it will continue its usual weekday service during the shutdown, which would start in time for tomorrow's morning rush.

"Metro is not a federal entity and would remain open during any government shutdown. Trains and buses will operate on regular schedules, and the system will open and close at regular times," the agency says in a release.

If the shutdown extends into later this week, Metro says that it will consider making changes to service to account for lower ridership.

"In the event of a shutdown lasting several days that results in significantly lower ridership, we may eventually make adjustments to 'right size' capacity if necessary. For example, we may operate more 6-car trains and fewer 8-car trains, because 8-car trains might not be necessary. We will communicate these changes publicly if any such decision is made," it says.

An extended shutdown could wreak havoc on the agency's finances, though. In a recent report, the agency said that a federal government closure during the 2012 Christmas holidays and the impact of Hurricane Sandy ate into expected revenues.

NPR

5 Under-The-Radar Reads From Librarian Nancy Pearl

Pearl shares the books she loved this year that you might not have heard of. Her list includes a Hollywood satire, two thrillers, a young adult novel and a nonfiction book about World War I.
NPR

What The Change In U.S.-Cuba Relations Might Mean For Food

The decision to normalize relations is driving all kinds of speculation about American food companies opening up shop in Cuba. But analysts say: Don't expect to see McDonald's there anytime soon.
NPR

Two Of Colorado's Neighbors Sue State Over Marijuana Law

Nebraska and Oklahoma have filed a lawsuit against Colorado with the U.S. Supreme Court, saying that its law legalizing marijuana isn't constitutional.
NPR

U.S. Authorities Investigate, Sony Reels From Computer Hack

The White House has stopped short of naming North Korea as the aggressor in the cyberattack against Sony Pictures. That hack resulted in the cancellation of the film The Interview.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.