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Hearing On Maryland Gun Law Set For Tuesday

A hearing will be held Tuesday to determine whether a portion of Maryland's extensive new gun law will go into effect. The lawsuit filed by several gun owners and gun rights advocates challenges the provision of the law banning certain assault-style rifles and large ammunition clips. The plaintiffs want the judge to prevent those bans from starting Tuesday, saying they infringe on their Second Amendment rights.

Montgomery County Sen. Brian Frosh, who helped shepherd the bill through the General Assembly earlier this year, isn't worried the lawsuit will stop the new laws.

"First of all, those are both constitutional," he says. "The Second Amendment, as far as I can recall, does not say we leave no weapon behind. They're wrong about the constitutionality, and the bulk of the law is going into effect unchallenged on October 1. It will save lives across the state as soon as it goes into effect."

What isn't being challenged is a key provision of the bill according to Frosh — requirements that anyone seeking to buy a handgun in Maryland after Tuesday submit fingerprints to the state police and finish a training course before they can get a license.

NPR

MTV's Rewinding The '90s With A New Channel

The '90s are back! Pokémon has taken over the world again. A Clinton is running for president. And now, MTV is reviving '90s favorites like Beavis and Butt-head on a new channel, MTV Classic.
NPR

Salvage Supperclub: A High-End Dinner In A Dumpster To Fight Food Waste

The ingredients — think wilted basil, bruised plums, garbanzo bean water — sound less than appetizing. Whipped together, they're a tasty meal that show how home cooks can use often-tossed foods.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour – LIVE from Slim's Diner!

This special edition of the Politics Hour is coming to you live from Slim's Diner from Petworth in Northwest D.C.

NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

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