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Hearing On Maryland Gun Law Set For Tuesday

A hearing will be held Tuesday to determine whether a portion of Maryland's extensive new gun law will go into effect. The lawsuit filed by several gun owners and gun rights advocates challenges the provision of the law banning certain assault-style rifles and large ammunition clips. The plaintiffs want the judge to prevent those bans from starting Tuesday, saying they infringe on their Second Amendment rights.

Montgomery County Sen. Brian Frosh, who helped shepherd the bill through the General Assembly earlier this year, isn't worried the lawsuit will stop the new laws.

"First of all, those are both constitutional," he says. "The Second Amendment, as far as I can recall, does not say we leave no weapon behind. They're wrong about the constitutionality, and the bulk of the law is going into effect unchallenged on October 1. It will save lives across the state as soon as it goes into effect."

What isn't being challenged is a key provision of the bill according to Frosh — requirements that anyone seeking to buy a handgun in Maryland after Tuesday submit fingerprints to the state police and finish a training course before they can get a license.

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