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O'Malley Worries That Government Shutdown Could Hurt State Economy

A shutdown of the federal government would be devastating for the state of Maryland, says Governor Martin O'Malley.

The governor appeared with President Obama yesterday at Prince George's Community College in Largo, where they discussed the exchanges as part of the Affordable Care Act that are due to go online Tuesday. O'Malley says he's fairly confident Maryland's marketplace will launch smoothly without any major problems.

But the potential 2016 Democratic presidential candidate is more than fairly confident that if the federal government gets shut down because of the funding fight over the law referred to as Obamacare, Maryland will suffer.

"It would be a real kick in the teeth for us. It's not something that would help us recover, it's something that would hurt our economy. Perhaps that's why the Republican Congress wants to do it. I think they have not been able to get out of the hostage-taking mode of governing," he said.

Maryland is home to many major federal installations, like the National Institutes of Health, the National Security Agency and several military bases.

NPR

Barbershop: UofL Basketball Ban, Football Concussions And The NFL Women's Summit

ESPN contributor Kevin Blackistone, Bloomberg View's Kavitha Davidson and The Washington Post's Wesley Lowery talk about the UofL basketball team, public opinion of the NFL, and women in sports.
NPR

After Introducing Changes, Keurig Sales Continue To Fall

Despite America's high coffee consumption, Keurig reported disappointing sales this week. Even during its popular holiday selling period, the numbers haven't perked up in recent years.
NPR

On The Clock: Rubio Gets The Most Talking Time In Tonight's Debate

It was the last debate before the New Hampshire primary and Donald Trump was back onstage. Which GOP candidate ended up with the most talking time?
NPR

How Limited Internet Access Can Subtract From Kids' Education

Smartphones are often credited with helping bridge the "digital divide" between people who do and don't have Internet access at home. But is mobile Internet enough for a family with a kid in school?

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