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Minor Weekend Delays On Metro Ahead Of Major Work Next Week

Those heading downtown from Dupont Circle next weekend will have to take a shuttle.
Chris Chester
Those heading downtown from Dupont Circle next weekend will have to take a shuttle.

Scheduled track work will cause minor delays on Metro this weekend, but the transit agency is already warning of MAJOR work coming next weekend.

No Metro stations are scheduled to close this weekend, and there's no work scheduled on the Green, Yellow, and Red Lines.

On the Blue and Orange Lines, passengers may have to wait a little longer than usual on the platform, with trains running once every 16 minutes starting at 10 p.m. Friday night. Normal weekend service is once every twelve minutes.

Metro is planning for big disruptions next weekend, with major track work scheduled for the Red Line through downtown Washington starting at 10 p.m. on Oct. 4 and lasting through Sunday the Oct. 6.

Shuttle buses will replace trains next weekend between Dupont Circle and NoMa Gallaudet. The Union Station, Judiciary Square, and Farragut North stations will be closed altogether, while Gallery Place and Metro Center will be closed to Red Line traffic, but open to other lines.

Again this is for next weekend, so enjoy the relatively minor delays this weekend while they last.

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