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Statue Of Ten Commandments Near Supreme Court Toppled

The depiction of the ten commandments is on 2nd Street NE, within view of the Supreme Court.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/39508945@N00/376054796/
The depiction of the ten commandments is on 2nd Street NE, within view of the Supreme Court.

A stone monument of the Ten Commandments that sits on a street behind the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington and was the subject of past controversy has been toppled by vandals.

The 3 foot square granite monument weighs 850 pounds and sits in front of the headquarters of Faith and Action, a Christian outreach ministry. The group installed the tablets in a garden outside its offices in 2006, and the group's president says the tablets were angled so that justices arriving at the high court would see them.

The Rev. Robert Schenck, who heads the organization, says the damage to the monument happened sometime between Friday night and Saturday night. That's when a minister who works in the area alerted the group that something was wrong. The vandalism was reported to police.

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