D.C. Could Compensate Residents Who Lost Homes Through Tax Lien Sales | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

D.C. Could Compensate Residents Who Lost Homes Through Tax Lien Sales

The D.C. government is looking into compensating homeowners who lost their properties through the city's tax lien program.

After a Washington Post investigation detailed how elderly residents lost their homes because of small unpaid tax bills that ballooned into much larger fees, the D.C. Council is taking steps to reform the tax lien program.

D.C. Council member Mary Cheh (D-Ward 3) introduced emergency legislation asking the audit office to go back and study the foreclosures caused by tax liens where the amount was $2500 or less.

"And then to look and see whether there are reasons of excusable neglect or our mistake or equitable considerations that would make any of this a candidate for some sort of compensation," she said.

Cheh says she has no idea how much it could cost taxpayers to potentially compensate these homeowners.

In the meantime, the city has halted its tax lien program and cancelled dozens of tax liens sold at an auction two months ago. The Council also approved emergency legislation capping the fees charged to homeowners.

NPR

A Puzzle With Everything, Including The Kitchen Sink

Each word provided is an anagram of something you might see in a kitchen. For example, "skin" is an anagram of "sink."
NPR

'Into The Wild' Author Tries Science To Solve Toxic Seed Mystery

Jon Krakauer has long been haunted by how Christopher McCandless died in the Alaskan wilderness. In a scientific journal, he and a chemist show that the seeds McCandless consumed can contain a toxin.
NPR

5 Things You Should Know About Carly Fiorina

The former CEO of Hewlett-Packard once had a stint filing and typing for the company. She also dropped out of law school, survived breast cancer and once ran a campaign ad featuring demon sheep.
NPR

3-D Printers Bring Historic Instruments Back To The Future

You just can't stick a modern mouthpiece on an antique saxophone and get the right sound. The answer could be in the lab.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.