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D.C. Could Compensate Residents Who Lost Homes Through Tax Lien Sales

The D.C. government is looking into compensating homeowners who lost their properties through the city's tax lien program.

After a Washington Post investigation detailed how elderly residents lost their homes because of small unpaid tax bills that ballooned into much larger fees, the D.C. Council is taking steps to reform the tax lien program.

D.C. Council member Mary Cheh (D-Ward 3) introduced emergency legislation asking the audit office to go back and study the foreclosures caused by tax liens where the amount was $2500 or less.

"And then to look and see whether there are reasons of excusable neglect or our mistake or equitable considerations that would make any of this a candidate for some sort of compensation," she said.

Cheh says she has no idea how much it could cost taxpayers to potentially compensate these homeowners.

In the meantime, the city has halted its tax lien program and cancelled dozens of tax liens sold at an auction two months ago. The Council also approved emergency legislation capping the fees charged to homeowners.

WAMU 88.5

Colson Whitehead On The Importance Of Historical Fiction In Tumultuous Times

Kojo talks with author Colson Whitehead about his new novel "The Underground Railroad" and its resonance at this particular moment in history.

NPR

'Cup Noodles' Turns 45: A Closer Look At The Revolutionary Ramen Creation

Today instant ramen is consumed in at least 80 countries around the world and even considered popular currency in American prisons.
WAMU 88.5

Rating The United States On Child Care

A majority of parents in the U.S. work outside the home. That means about 12 million children across the country require care. A new report ranks states on cost, quality and availability of child care - and says nobody is getting it right.

NPR

Scientists To Bid A Bittersweet Farewell To Rosetta, The Comet Chaser

To cap its 12-year scientific voyage, the Rosetta spacecraft will take a final plunge Friday. Scientists will signal Rosetta to crash into the surface of a comet — and gather data all the way down.

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