Floyd Corkins Sentenced To 25 Years For Family Research Council Shooting | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Floyd Corkins Sentenced To 25 Years For Family Research Council Shooting

Floyd Corkins, the man who plotted a mass shooting at the Family Research Council offices near Gallery Place, has been sentenced to 25 years.

Leo Johnson rose in court and looked into the eyes of the man who nearly killed him.

"I told Mr. Corkins that although I forgave him, I would never forget, because of the pain and suffering that myself and my family have to go through," Johnson said.

The security guard known as "Leo the Hero" told the judge that the past year has been the most difficult of his life, recovering from multiple surgeries to mend the bullet wound in his right arm. Johnson stopped the 29-year-old Corkins from perpetrating a mass shooting at the Christian lobbying group's headquarters, fighting with him in the building's lobby until he was able to snatch away Corkins' 9mm pistol.

"Part of it was adrenaline. The other part was, I had to fight for my life," Johnson said. "I realized that if I didn't get the gun from Mr. Corkins he was going to kill me and he was going to kill all of my co-workers."

Johnson said he could have shot Corkins, but divine intervention stopped him.

"When I finally felt the pain from the gunshot and I was enraged, and I looked at my arm and I was enraged, but as quickly that rage came upon me, the Lord spoke to me and told me not to take his life," Johnson said.

Corkins, who pleaded guilty to three counts, admitted to investigators that he wanted to kill as many people as he could, then denigrate their bodies with 15 Chick-fil-A sandwiches he had stuffed in his backpack.

He was looking to make a political point about the opposition to gay marriage on the part the Family Research Council and restaurant chain.

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