WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Ahead Of Implementation Of Obamacare, Va. Faces Shortage Of Doctors

Virginia may not have the doctors needed to handle the influx of patients expected under the federal Affordable Care Act, according to a new report.

Virginia has more than 16,000 doctors across the state, but 48 percent are primary care doctors. One problem is that primary care physicians make considerably less money than medical practitioners in specialty fields, according to a report by the state's Joint Commission on Health Care.

Additionally, economically distressed regions are having a tough time retaining primary care doctors and medical professionals of any type. The physician-to-population ratio is especially low in the Southside, Southwest and some urban areas. Additionally, nearly 20 percent of doctors expect to retire in the next five years.

Commission member and Senator George Barker says the state must now decide how to attract and retain more physicians. Barker says lawmakers will submit several proposals in the upcoming and later legislative sessions, but any solutions will take time to implement and be effective.

There are an estimated 844,000 uninsured people in Virginia.

NPR

How Mike Birbiglia Applies 'Yes, And ...' To Improv And Beyond

Birbiglia's new film follows a fictional New York improv troupe. Don't Think Twice explores the tension between personal ambition and being an "endlessly generous" team player.
NPR

Scraped, Splattered — But Silent No More. Finally, The Dinner Plate Gets Its Say

Instagram is the Internet's semi-obsessive, borderline-creepy love letter to food. But behind every great meal is a plate doing a pretty-OK job. So a comedian made an Instagram to celebrate plates.
NPR

Post Republican Convention Wrap-Up: Did The Party Make Progress On Unity?

The Republican National Convention wrapped up on Thursday. Ron Elving was there, and tells NPR's Scott Simon about the ups and downs of the four day meeting.
NPR

Making The Cloud Green: Tech Firms Push For Renewable Energy Sources

Few people can demand what kind of electricity they get. But Microsoft and Facebook, which operate huge, power-hungry data centers, are trying to green up the electricity grid with their buying power.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.