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On Day After Shooting, Navy Yard Remains Closed

The Washington Navy Yard is closed this morning as the FBI continues to investigate yesterday's shootings at the installation.

Navy officials have said that the Navy Yard will remain closed today, with the exception of emergency responders and essential personnel.

Vice Admiral Peter Daly, the Chief Executive Officer of the United States Naval Institute, said a shooting of this magnitude on a naval installation is unprecedented.

"I served for 34 years, and I don't know of another case during my tenure where something like this occurred, and just checking, I cannot find another example where there was a mass shooting. There's individual cases, but nothing like this," he said.

Daly said that the Navy does annual security drills to prepare for situations like yesterday's shootings.

"There's an annual program of training where they throw different scenarios at the shore installations in the United States and overseas, and I happen to know this was done last February, and this was one of the scenarios, was a shooter scenario," he noted.

The Navy is offering counselors and chaplains to those immediately impacted by the shootings.


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