FISA Court Backs NSA Program Of Phone Data Collection | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

FISA Court Backs NSA Program Of Phone Data Collection

A special federal surveillance court has reaffirmed the constitutionality of a National Security Agency program that collects data about most of the nation's phone traffic. NPR's Larry Abramson reports that the court says the records of phone metadata are not protected by the Fourth Amendment.

The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court says continuation of the controversial collection program is justified as a way to prevent terror attacks. The opinion points out that the Supreme Court has ruled that information about the time and length of phone calls is not protected in the same way as the actual content. The opinion says the program can continue because the government adheres to restrictions meant to protect the privacy of innocent callers.

Recent leaks show the NSA has violated those restrictions repeatedly. The NSA says those violations were accidental. The FISA court's ruling was dated Aug. 29, but released on Tuesday.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Trevor Noah Will Replace Jon Stewart As Host Of 'The Daily Show'

South African comedian Trevor Noah will step into the role Jon Stewart has filled for more than 15 years. He confirmed reports of his new job Monday morning.
NPR

Cheez Whiz Helped Spread Processed Foods. Will It Be Squeezed Out?

Turns out, the history of Kraft's dull-orange cheese spread says a lot about the processed food industry — and where it might be headed as Kraft and Heinz merge.
WAMU 88.5

Will McAuliffe Make Good On Campaign Promises In Virginia?

Virginia lawmakers will be back in session next month, and the governor will try once again to deliver on the campaign promises that were central to his campaign.

NPR

App That Aims To Make Books 'Squeaky Clean' Draws Ire From Edited Writers

Clean Reader — an app designed to find, block and replace profanity in books — has drawn considerable criticism from authors. This week, makers of the app announced they would no longer sell e-books.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.