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D.C. Council Returns From Summer Recess To Face Veto Override, Censure Vote

The D.C. Council is holding its first legislative session since breaking for summer recess, and members will be getting right back to business with several key issues up for a vote.

The biggest vote planned for today is the potential override of Mayor Vincent Gray's veto of the so-called living wage bill that targets Walmart and other large retailers.

Eight council members voted to approve the legislation when it passed in July, requiring certain large retailers to pay employees $12.50 an hour. Nine will be needed for an override, but so far no Council member has indicated they will change their vote. Heavy lobbying will be expected until the last minute.

Another critical vote will be the possible censure of Council member Marion Barry.

A special D.C Council committee has recommended the former mayor be censured and stripped of his committee chairmanship for accepting nearly $7,000 dollars in cash from two city contractors. Nine votes will be needed for the resolution to pass.

Barry was censured by council and stripped of a chairmanship in 2010 for helping a former girlfriend receive a city contract.

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