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D.C. Council Returns From Summer Recess To Face Veto Override, Censure Vote

The D.C. Council is holding its first legislative session since breaking for summer recess, and members will be getting right back to business with several key issues up for a vote.

The biggest vote planned for today is the potential override of Mayor Vincent Gray's veto of the so-called living wage bill that targets Walmart and other large retailers.

Eight council members voted to approve the legislation when it passed in July, requiring certain large retailers to pay employees $12.50 an hour. Nine will be needed for an override, but so far no Council member has indicated they will change their vote. Heavy lobbying will be expected until the last minute.

Another critical vote will be the possible censure of Council member Marion Barry.

A special D.C Council committee has recommended the former mayor be censured and stripped of his committee chairmanship for accepting nearly $7,000 dollars in cash from two city contractors. Nine votes will be needed for the resolution to pass.

Barry was censured by council and stripped of a chairmanship in 2010 for helping a former girlfriend receive a city contract.


No Meekness Here: Meet Rosa Parks, 'Lifelong Freedom Fighter'

As the 60th anniversary of the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott approaches, author Jeanne Theoharis says it's time to let go of the image of Rosa Parks as an unassuming accidental activist.

Internet Food Culture Gives Rise To New 'Eatymology'

Internet food culture has brought us new words for nearly every gastronomical condition. The author of "Eatymology," parodist Josh Friedland, discusses "brogurt" with NPR's Rachel Martin.
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World Leaders Meet For The UN Climate Change Summit In Paris

World leaders meet for the UN climate change summit in Paris to discuss plans for reducing carbon emissions. What's at stake for the talks, and prospects for a major agreement.


Payoffs For Prediction: Could Markets Help Identify Terrorism Risk?

In a terror prediction market, people would bet real money on the likelihood of attacks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about whether such a market could predict — and deter — attacks.

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