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Invasive Snakehead Fish Continues To Populate Potomac

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The head of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says the agency is continuing its fight against the invasive snakehead fish, but he says they face an uphill battle.

Snakehead fish are native to Africa and Asia, but they're setting up roots in the region's waterways. Dan Ash, the head of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, says his agency continues to work with Maryland and Virginia officials to try to combat them.

He says there's still significant concern on the potential impact on native species in the Potomac. But they're behind on the fight, and there isn't a lot officials can do.

"Once they're established in an aquatic system, it's almost impossible to get rid of them," he says. "You have to implement some kind of containment strategy at that point."

Ash is calling for Congress to update the law that allows the federal government to combat invasive species, because officials have to go through bureaucratic hoops and hurdles while species are taking root, leaving officials one step behind.


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