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'I-55 Bandit' Andrew Maberry Arrested In String Of Bank Robberies

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On a sunny summer morning in late July, a man in a red ball cap, polo shirt and dark sunglasses casually strolled out of the Susquehanna Bank on 94th Street in Ocean City with an undisclosed amount of money he had just heisted. He then got in his car, and disappeared off the island without a trace, leaving local police completely baffled.

FBI officials believe this man was 19-year-old Andrew Maberry, aka the I-55 bandit. They believe Maberry is responsible for 10 successful bank robberies and two more attempted robberies since last May in a crime spree that included banks in Maryland, Tennessee, West Virginia, Missouri, and Illinois.

Maberry turned himself in to the FBI after St. Louis police and FBI officials launched an aggressive publicity campaign to identify him.

It hasn't been revealed just how much Maberry got away with, and he's only been charged with one of the bank robberies thus far.

The four Maryland banks police believe Maberry heisted are in Ocean City, Essex, and two in Bel Air. Police say Maberry never once pulled a gun.

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