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D.C. Begins Repaving 15th Street Bike Lane

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Work on the 15th Street bike lane will continue for the next three weeks.
WAMU/Martin Di Caro
Work on the 15th Street bike lane will continue for the next three weeks.

Work on the busiest bike lane in the District is underway. The District Department of Transportation has started to prepare the 15th Street bike lane for resurfacing from K all the way north to Swann Street.

"It shows that the city is committed to this idea of protected bike lanes. They see value for all residents, and they are going to put resources into maintaining them. It's not just a fad," says Kishan Putta, a Dupont Circle ANC commissioner.

DDOT crews are working on the curbs and gutters now. The actual repaving will begin in about two weeks and take four to five days, a few blocks at a time. There will not be a temporary bike lane on 15th Street during the work. Putta says bicyclists will have to use a detour.

"Sixteenth Street is nearby, but I wouldn't recommend it during rush hour since it is pretty clogged with traffic and buses and doesn't have any bike lanes. 14th Street has bike lanes going north and south," advises Putta.

Roughly 350 cyclists per hour use the 15th Street bike lane during the morning and evening commutes.


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