Singles Poured In To D.C. Over Last Decade | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Singles Poured In To D.C. Over Last Decade

If you have a sneaking suspicion that D.C. is stocked with young singles, well, you're not wrong.

According to figures released by the Chief Financial Office this week, the number of single tax-filers in D.C. increased by 38 percent from 2001 to 2011, jumping by over 57,000 people. By 2011, the number of single filers hit 208,176, or 63 percent of all tax-filers in the city.

All told, the number of tax-filers from 2001 to 2011 grew by 65,900 people to reach 327,371. According to the CFO, 87.5 percent of those new filers were single.

Over the same period, the number of married filers only increased by 10,301—19.8 percent. The number of head-of-household filers—those that are unmarried and caring for a dependent—decreased by 3.5 percent.

The data squares with other demographic changes taking place in D.C. The city's population has grown by over 60,000 since 2000, with half that growth coming between 2010 and 2012. This June the U.S. Census reported that D.C. has grown younger and whiter, with the proportion of black residents dipping to just over 50 percent and the median age ticking down from 33.8 to 33.6.

D.C. is also a good place to look for a job, especially if you're fresh out of college: The Atlantic reports that the metropolitan area ranks third in the country in terms of job openings for recent college grads.

Additionally, fewer people across the U.S. are getting married. According to the Pew Center, the number of newly-wed adults in 2011 stood at 4.2 million, down from 4.5 million in 2008. D.C.'s marriage rate has been low relative to the national average—in 2009, for example, there were 6.8 marriages per 1,000 people in the U.S., but only 4.7 in D.C.—though it ticked up in 2010 and 2011—the first two years that same-sex marriages were permitted.

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