Norton Optimistic On Future Of D.C. Budget Autonomy | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Norton Optimistic On Future Of D.C. Budget Autonomy

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When Congress returns this week, lawmakers have to work out this year's spending bills, which D.C. Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton says could inch the District closer to controlling its own budget.

Besides one provision banning local dollars from funding abortions, Norton was able to help beat back every restriction to the District's budget this year.

"What's most important for the District out of the appropriations and out of this entire session is the big steps made for budget autonomy," says Norton.

She says it's been a good year for D.C. because voters approved a referendum calling for local budget control, and officials were able to get the president to call for D.C. budget autonomy in his budget.

The Senate version grants D.C. autonomy, and some House lawmakers are trying to amend their spending bill for D.C. so that local officials would be allowed to spend the city's money with no restrictions, which makes Norton optimistic.

"So you see, we've made tremendous strides, and I'm hoping this is the year we can get budget autonomy for the District of Columbia," she says.

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